The Knives Are Out in Eagle Forum Power Struggle

Donald Trump's campaign for the Republican presidential nomination has been exposing fissures in the network of right-wing pressure groups that have long supported the GOP. Now a prominent Texas GOP and religious-right activist seems to be playing a key role in behind-the-scenes intrigues that are fueling charges of conspiracy and betrayal. Read More

Texas Eagle Forum’s Cathie Adams: Schlafly Was Manipulated into Endorsing Trump

Yes, by most accounts Donald Trump’s campaign for the White House has been a terrible thing for the country and for our politics. And it’s turning out to be a terrible thing for the relationship between the far-right Texas Eagle Forum and the group’s national founder, conservative icon and activist Phyllis Schlafly.

And it’s all because Schlafly has endorsed Trump over Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

To be fair, the rift isn’t just between Schlafly and the Texas affiliate of the Eagle Forum. Other state Eagle Forum affiliates are also at odds with Schlafly over the Trump endorsement, mostly because the affiliates have been backing Cruz. But it’s the way in which the Texas Eagle Forum reacted to Schlafly’s endorsement that’s particularly surprising.

Cathie Adams, who once served as the chair of the Republican Party of Texans and was head of Texas Eagle Forum before stepping down to run for vice chair of the Texas GOP this year, dismissed the endorsement of Trump with an ageist attack on Schlafly. As Adams told the Dallas Morning News, Trump supporters are taking advantage of the Eagle Forum’s 91-year-old founder:

“We have no respect for that man. [Schlafly’s endorsement] is going to be widely dismissed. At… Read More

First they came for the homosexuals. Then they came for the abortionists. Now religious-righters are coming for you, fantasy football fans.

Cathie Adams, head of the far-right Texas Eagle Forum, sent to her email list today a new essay — penned by the group’s national leader and founder, Phyllis Schlafly — attacking folks who enjoy playing fantasy football.

Schlafly’s essay describes how hellish fantasy football really is:

“Fantasy football means imaginary games played by imaginary teams in imaginary leagues, which are made up of real players whose playing statistics are compiled from real football games. So instead of betting on the actual NFL games, fantasy football participants bet on something that depends on the actual NFL games.”

So the game involves creating “imaginary” entities whose ultimate success depends on the performance of actual individuals who make up those entities. Hmmm… It sounds a lot like mutual fund investing. Diabolical.

Schlafly goes on to explain how fantasy football hurts its participants:

“It’s illegal in most places to bet on actual NFL games, but fantasy football enables participants to do something similar by betting on fantasy teams that win or lose based on how real NFL players perform each week in real NFL games. Participants then… Read More

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is upset about President Obama's comments that a Supreme Court decision to overturn the health care reform law, the Affordable Care Act, would represent “unprecedented, extraordinary” judicial activism. Senator McConnell said today that the president is trying to "intimidate" the Supreme Court: “With his words, he was no longer trying to embarrass the Court after a decision; rather, he tried to intimidate it before a decision has been made. And that should be intolerable to all of us.” Oh, cry me a river. Senator McConnell is ignoring the right's decades-long assault on an independent judiciary. Last year, for example, Republican presidential candidate and former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich suggested that judges who make decisions he think represent judicial activism should be arrested. Gingrich has also said that judges who engage in what he calls "judicial supremacy" should be impeached. Texas Gov. Rick Perry also attacks what he considers judicial activism and argues that judges can be held "accountable" by ending lifetime tenure. He even calls the Supreme Court "nine oligarchs in robes." Read More

It's fascinating to watch religious-righters fight among themselves over which Republican candidate is extreme enough to support for president in next year's elections. Today we saw one religious-right leader, Phyllis Schlafly of Eagle Forum, even redefine "middle class" in her attack on Texas Gov. Rick Perry's proposed flat-ish tax. Schlafly -- who says nice things about Herman Cain and Rick Santorum in the race for the GOP presidential nomination -- argues in a column today that Gov. Perry "want(s) to undermine marriage." She's angry that his tax plan, which she says has an "anti-family bias," isn't hard enough on unmarried parents. And in rejecting the claim by a Perry spokesman that the plan "protects the middle class," Schlafly even redefines what "middle class" means: "No; giving that size deduction to unmarried parents, defined as 'individuals and their dependents,' means rewarding bad behavior and is, by definition, outside the middle class. Regardless of income, you can't be middle class without respecting middle-class values, the most important of which is marriage." Read More

Texas Freedom Network

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