It’s one thing to support the right of parents to educate their own children at home. But are right-wing groups like the Texas Home School Coalition (THSC) simply hostile to the concept of public education altogether? Sure seems like it considering that former Pennsylvania senator and 2012 Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum will be the featured speaker at a major THSC fundraiser next month in Lakeway west of Austin.

Santorum’s extremist views on issues like opposing LGBT equality and birth control have made him a hero among religious-right activists. For example, Santorum has compared marriage equality to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and argued that overturning sodomy laws would lead to “man on child, man on dog” sex.Β (He went on to lament the fact that government “doesn’t have the rights to limit individuals’ wants and passions.”)Β He has also suggested that states should have the authority to ban people — everyone — from using birth control.

But Santorum is also hostile to public education, something else that thrills religious-righters. Santorum and his wife home-schooled their children. During the Republican presidential nomination contest in 2012, The Hill reported about Santorum’s educationRead More

Rick Santorum, a favorite of religious-right activists, has endorsed Ted Cruz in the Republican primary race for the U.S. Senate seat from Texas. Religious-right leaders meeting at a Texas ranch last January endorsed Santorum in his bid for the GOP presidential nomination. Santorum suspended his campaign in April.

In addition to his opposition to equal rights for gay Americans and to abortion, Santorum thinks states should have the right to ban contraception. He has also argued that health insurance shouldn’t cover prenatal testing because such procedures, he says, lead to more abortions. And he calls colleges “indoctrination mills” that threaten the country because they lead students to question their religious faith.

Earlier this month Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin also endorsed Cruz, a former solicitor general for Texas.

Polls show that the frontrunner in the Texas Senate race is Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst. Dewhurst has the support of various religious-right leaders as well, including former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee. Gov. Rick Perry is also backing Dewhurst.

Other Republican candidates for the Senate seat include former Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert and former ESPN commentator Craig James.… Read More

From a religious-right group’s email to activists today:

“Rick Santorum is from God and will win with Christians and Catholics uniting for Santorum.”

“Christians and Catholics”? As if Catholics aren’t Christians?

Of course, it’s bad enough that religious-righters try to deify their favored political candidates (like Santorum). But the suggestion that Catholics are something other than Christians should tell you what they really think about even their supposed allies.… Read More

Rick Santorum just cannot help himself. Political pundits and strategists affiliated with his own party have been virtually screaming at him, telling him that if he wants any shot at winning in November he needs to quit the culture wars and stick to jobs, jobs, jobs. But, again, he just can’t help himself.

On Thursday, Santorum sat down with professional conspiracy theorist and right-wing radio talk show host Glenn Beck for a wide-ranging interview, during which he dropped this whopper:

I understand why Barack Obama wants to send every kid to college, because of their indoctrination mills, absolutely. The indoctrination that is going on at the university level is a harm to our country.

The proof? For President Obama’s alleged nefarious motivations, Santorum offered none. For colleges as “indoctrination mills,” Santorum noted that β€œ62 percent of kids who go into college with a faith commitment leave without it.”

62 percent? Wow, that is a big number, isn’t it? You know what’s an even bigger number? 76 percent (more on this in a bit).

We were curious, so we went looking for the source of Santorum’s information and found that the Republican presidential candidate likes his facts picked like… Read More

Unbelievable.

Just a few days ago we told you about a good ol’ tactic right-wingers like to use: questioning a politician’s Christianity or claiming the politician is not Christian at all.

This morning it was Franklin Graham’s turn. Graham, the son of famed evangelist Billy Graham, was on MSNBC’s Morning Joe taking questions from the panel. The conversation went something like this (quotes paraphrased):

MSNBC: Is President Obama a Christian?

Graham: Ask him. I assume he is, but it’s not for me to say.

MSNBC: What about Mormon Mitt Romney, is he a Christian?

Graham: I can’t know what’s in another man’s heart.

MSNBC: Is Rick Santorum a Christian?

Graham: Oh, totally.

MSNBC: But you just said …

Graham: I know what I said. Rick Santorum is a Christian.

MSNBC: Isn’t that a double standard?

Graham: You have to look at what a person does with his life (this one is an actual quote). Oh, and by the way, thrice-married Newt Gingrich is a Christian, too.

You can watch the actual exchange in its entirety here.

If you’ve finished watching the clip and are done beating your head against your desk, click here toRead More

Lilith Fund

Follow @naraltx for updates today on the terrible anti-choice attack, #SB23, which is being heard in the HHS Senate committee. #txlege twitter.com/naraltx/…