Robert Jeffress, the far-right pastor of a Dallas megachurch and a prominent supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, on Monday launched into a planned two-week attack on evolution -- and he pointed to the Texas Freedom Network and battles over science at the Texas State Board of Education. Read More

The right’s contempt for facts is especially evident when it comes to issues like climate change and evolution. Here’s some of the science denialism we heard from the right on in 2015. (Click here for previous posts on what we heard from the right in 2015.)

“I’m going to punt on that one as well. That’s a question a politician shouldn’t be involved in one way or another. I love the evolution of trade in Wisconsin.”

– Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, responding to questions about his thoughts on evolution during his failed campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.

“No, it hasn’t changed my mind. We all have the same evidence, and it’s just a matter of how you interpret it. There’s no dates stamped on these things.”

– Canadian Edgar Nernberg, who serves on the board of a creationist museum that promotes the idea that Earth is only about 6,000 years old, explaining his personal discovery of 60-million-year-old fish fossil.

“Humans, horses, and other animals do not use similar facial muscles and communicative expressions because of shared ancestry, but they do share a common Designer and so we would expect to see similarities in living things — and… Read More

Sort of. From Associated Press:

Alabama is updating its decade-old science standards to require that students understand evolution and learn about climate change, topics that can still be controversial in the Bible Belt state.

Educators say the new rules — part of a major change that includes more experimentation and hands-on instruction and less lecturing — don’t require that students believe in evolution or accept the idea that climate is changing globally.

But public school students will be required for the first time to understand the theory of evolution. And teachers will be required to address climate change, which wasn’t a focus the last time the state set science standards in 2005.

Unfortunately, Alabama still requires textbooks to cast doubt on evolution. From the same story:

Textbooks used in Alabama science classes have carried a disclaimer sticker for years stating that evolution is a “controversial theory,” not fact, and the new course of study doesn’t change the warnings, which were advocated by Christian conservatives.

Back in 2009, the State Board of Education in Texas approved new curriculum standards that creationists hoped would force publishers to include discredited arguments attacking evolution in their new textbooks. But the Texas Freedom… Read More

How far will religious-righters go to use faith as a weapon to harm others? Pretty far — including demanding government help to do it.

Answers in Genesis, a militantly anti-evolution ministry, is suing the state of Kentucky for the right of its proposed creation theme park to discriminate on the basis of religion even while getting $18 million in tax incentives.

Kentucky tourism officials told Answers in Genesis in December that the proposed Ark Encounter creationist theme park won’t be eligible for the tax incentives unless the organization pledges not to discriminate in hiring based on religion. That’s a requirement any non-religious business must meet. But Answers in Genesis President Ken Ham is claiming that Kentucky officials are hostile to religion:

“(T)he state was so insistent on treating our religious entity as a second-class citizen that we were simply left with no alternative but to proceed to court. This is the latest example of increasing government hostility towards religion in America, and it’s certainly among the most blatant.”

Ham — who has attacked the Texas Freedom Network for defending the teaching of evolution — is talking nonsense. The state is simply treating his proposed theme park as it would any… Read More

“False ideas are the greatest obstacle to progress. Evolution, the idea that all life is descended from a common ancestor, is a false idea.”

— Don McLeroy (@DonMcLeroy) November 26, 2014

“False ideas are the greatest obstacle to progress. Evolution, the idea that all life is descended from a common ancestor, is a false idea.”

That’s a tweet today from the creationist former chairman of the Texas State Board of Education, Don McLeroy. McLeroy helped lead the right’s campaign from 2008 to 2010 to dumb down teaching on both evolution and climate change in new public school textbooks. He and his fellow anti-science fanatics failed completely. Thanks to the hard and costly work of the Texas Freedom Network, fantastic coalition partners like the National Center for Science Education and Climate Parents, and tens of thousands of supporters, new science and social studies textbooks in Texas teach the truth about both evolution and climate change without the “false ideas” that McLeroy wanted in them.

That’s something we can all be thankful for. As 2014 draws to a close, please consider helping TFN replenish our resources for the battles ahead both at the State Board of Education and, especially in 2015, the… Read More

Texas Freedom Network

.@iamjohnoliver used the clip in @LastWeekTonight for a segment on how the history of race in America is taught in schools. (2/2) #txed youtu.be/hsxukOPEdgg