The religious right strategically uses religion and religious language, combined with patriotic symbols, to push a political agenda that has little connection to the values of mainstream people of faith. It is, in short, a political rather than religious movement. The Texas Freedom Network has monitored the religious right in Texas since 1995.

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The Knives Are Out in Eagle Forum Power Struggle

Donald Trump's campaign for the Republican presidential nomination has been exposing fissures in the network of right-wing pressure groups that have long supported the GOP. Now a prominent Texas GOP and religious-right activist seems to be playing a key role in behind-the-scenes intrigues that are fueling charges of conspiracy and betrayal. Read More

Ken Paxton, Obsessed with Defending Discrimination, Is Politicizing the Texas Attorney General’s Office

Texas Freedom Network President Kathy Miller warned today that Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is further politicizing the state’s chief law enforcement agency with the appointment of yet another prominent culture warrior to a top staff position in his office. Read More

The Lies They Tell II

So not only are religious-right groups lying about why they support North Carolina's anti-LGBT discrimination law, they also appear to be exaggerating when making claims about who else supports it. Read More

The Lies They Tell

The backlash from business and civil liberties advocates over North Carolina's new law encouraging discrimination against LGBT people is getting bigger and hotter. So religious-right groups are focusing their efforts in support of the law on the same dishonest and disgusting argument they used to defeat the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance -- that barring discrimination against transgender people endangers women and children in public restrooms. Read More

Paxton Deputy: Words in the Law Matter, Except When They Don’t

Jeff Mateer, who was recently hired as a top deputy of indicted Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, doesn’t believe there is such a thing as church-state separation. When he has spoken at schools or colleges, he has offered $100 to anyone who can point to where “separation of church and state” is mentioned in the Constitution.

“It’s not there,” he likes to say.

It’s odd, then, that when it comes to the law that required Paxton to offer to the general public the opportunity to apply for Mateer’s job, Mateer wants you to stop focusing so much on the letter of the law.

According to the Dallas Morning News, Paxton was required by state law to post Mateer’s position publicly if outside candidates were under consideration. Paxton didn’t post Mateer’s position nor did he publicly post the position of his new communications director Marc Rylander, who was previously a pastor at Paxton’s church in Plano.

But Mateer says that’s all cool. From the DMN article:

Mateer told The News that Paxton’s office believes the law allows the attorney general to appoint “people who are at the level of deputy and above.”

While… Read More

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